Fathom Fund Launches Pilot Crowdfunding Campaign

Funds raised will help measure and monitor pollution impacting shellfish, salmon, and southern resident killer whales in the Salish Sea

A hub of industry, agriculture, and recreation, the Salish Sea is a network of coastal waterways. It’s the home of all five species of Pacific salmon, a vital habitat for killer whales, and a crucial stopover for the largest migration of birds in North America. The area is also the focus of the Fathom Fund’s pilot campaign.

The Salish Sea’s coastline is heavily developed and a legacy of industry from decades ago is still locked in its soils. Chemicals that break down very slowly have remained even though they’re not used today. Once these pollutants enter the marine environment, they make their way up the food chain and create high toxicity levels in salmon—the southern resident killer whales’ main food source.  

An estuarine salt marsh is an important habitat for juvenile salmon. Some studies in the Salish Sea have found that the level of exposure to pollution during the month juvenile salmon spend here is related to marine survival.

An estuarine salt marsh is an important habitat for juvenile salmon. Some studies in the Salish Sea have found that the level of exposure to pollution during the month juvenile salmon spend here is related to marine survival.

Today, there are only 78 remaining southern resident killer whales remaining. These critically-endangered individuals have some of the highest levels of toxic contamination of any species on the planet. The release of pollutants in their food web is one of the many human-caused factors contributing to their decline.

Nathan Vadeboncoeur, an entrepreneur and researcher working to support coastal management in the Salish Sea, has launched the Fathom Fund’s first crowdfunding campaign to raise funds that will help solve these critical problems.

His project will measure the levels of toxins in estuaries around the mouth of the Little Campbell River. This will assist with efforts to create a healthy marine environment by supporting habitat restoration work and by helping trace the sources of new pollutants entering the ocean.  

The project will also provide valuable data that will benefit Semiahmoo First Nation in their efforts to reopen a shellfish fishery which has been closed since the 1970s.

Measuring and monitoring pollution is expensive, and out of reach for many of the people working to make our coast healthier. As a Fathom Fund supporter, you have the power to put the right tools in the hands of the people protecting our shores by backing Nathan’s campaign.

Each dollar you give releases an additional three dollars to pay for pollution testing and mapping. Stand up for salmon. Stand up for killer whales. Stand up for a healthy coast. Donate today!